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Saloon coach No. 98      Six-wheel service coach No. 4720      Narrow gauge freight van No. BB1006 of the Hedjaz Railway 
Saloon coach No. 98.
Built in England in 1922 by the Birmingham RC&W Co. for Palestine Railways as a day saloon and converted in 1929 to a night saloon. The coach was used for conveying the Railways' general manager and officers, as well as wealthy passengers and dignitaries such as government officials and visiting heads of state. Amongst the travelers who used this and the other saloon coaches in Palestine and Israel (until the mid-1960s) were Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia, the King and Queen of Belgium and David Ben-Gurion, Israel's first prime-minister.
Six-wheel service coach No. 4720.
Built in Belgium about 1893 for the Egyptian State Railways as a passenger coach. Dozens of this type of coaches were used in ambulance trains by the British Army during its Palestine Campaign in World War One to evacuate the wounded from the front. This particular coach was captured by Israel in the Sinai Peninsula in the 1956 war with Egypt and was used in breakdown-trains.
  Narrow gauge freight van No. BB1006 of the Hedjaz Railway.
Built by Haine St. Pierre, Belgium in 1909 and equipped with an external brakeman's cabin.
 
 Narrow gauge 0-6-0 tank locomotive No. 10 of the Hedjaz Railway  Light hand-powered push trolley for standard-gauge track inspection  Diesel-hydraulic 0-6-0 shunting locomotive No. 212
Narrow gauge 0-6-0 tank locomotive No. 10 of the Hedjaz Railway.
Built by Krauss, Germany in 1902, mainly used for shunting. This is the only complete steam locomotive remaining in Israel.
Light hand-powered push trolley for standard-gauge track inspection.
Carried up to two track inspectors while being pushed by two trolley boys.
Diesel-hydraulic 0-6-0 shunting locomotive No. 212.
Built by Esslingen, Germany in 1955, used mainly for shunting and trip-working in and around stations and rail yards. Purchased by Israel Railways as part of the Holocaust reparations agreement between Germany and Israel.
 
 Brake van No. 1419  Diesel-mechanical 0-4-0 shunting locomotive No. 203 (mistakingly bearing No. 201)  Ex-British Railways Mk. 2C coach No. 688
Brake van No. 1419.
Built in 1939 by La Brugeoise, Belgium for the Egyptian State Railways. Captured by Israel during the Sinai War of 1956. Brake vans ('cabooses' in North American parlance), in which the train's guard would travel, were used for assisting in trains braking, before the wide-spread adoption of driver-operated continuous (automatic) air brakes by Israel Railways.
Diesel-mechanical 0-4-0 shunting locomotive No. 203 (mistakingly bearing No. 201).
Built by Deutz of Germany in 1958. Purchased as part of the Holocaust reparations agreement between Germany and Israel and used for light shunting and work trains.
Ex-British Railways Mk. 2C coach No. 688.
Built in 1970 and purchased second-hand by Israel Railways in 1977 as special reserved accommodation.
 
 Six-wheel flat wagon No. 3601  Travelling concrete bunker No. 0001 "The Hillmens Pride" [sic]  Tank wagon No. 4176
Six-wheel flat wagon No. 3601.
The wagon carries a Diesel engine made by Maybach, Germany, taken from an Esslingen shunting locomotive, as well as a model of a gantry container crane for loading and off-loading from flat wagons.
Travelling concrete bunker No. 0001 "The Hillmens Pride" [sic].
Used by the British Army as a mobile defence post, mounted on a flat wagon during the 1936-9 disturbances. Now the bunker sits on flat wagon No. 1124, originally built in World War II as a box car in the USA.
Tank wagon No. 4176.
Built in 1941 by Gloucester RC&W Co. of England for the War Department (British Army).
 
 Tender from P-Class 4-6-0 steam locomotive No. 62  Diesel-electric Bo'Bo' locomotive No. 102  Steam breakdown cranes
Tender from P-Class 4-6-0 steam locomotive No. 62.
The tender and the locomotive it accompanied were built by The North British Locomotive Co. in Scotland in 1935 for the Palestine Railways.
Diesel-electric Bo'Bo' locomotive No. 102.
One of the first three Diesel locomotives purchased by Israel Railways. Built by AFB, Belgium in 1951 with propulsion system supplied by General Motors, USA. All three locomotives worked in a wide variety of roles for Israel Railways until 1998.
Steam breakdown cranes.
Built by Cowans Sheldon, England. Used for construction and maintenance and for breakdown trains. Crane No. C-25-1 (red) was built in 1918 for the British Army and has a maximum lifting capacity of 25 Ton. Crane No. C-30-1 (green) was built in 1950 for the Egyptian State Railways with a maximum lifting capacity of 30 Ton and later captured by Israel in the 1956 Sinai War.
 
 120-ton capacity well wagon  Diesel-electric Co'Co' locomotive No. 163  Diesel-electric Bo'Bo' locomotive No. 107
120-ton capacity well wagon.
Built by Familleureux , Belgium in 1951. This was the first new rolling-stock purchased by Israel Railways after its establishment. It  has  20  wheels and was mainly used for delivering heavy equipment for the Israel Electric Corp.
Diesel-electric Co'Co' locomotive No. 163.
This model G16 was built for Egyptian Railways in 1961 by General Motors, USA. It was captured with two others of the same type in the Six Day War of 1967. These locomotives were mostly used for hauling freight trains in the Negev Region of Southern Israel.
Diesel-electric Bo'Bo' locomotive No. 107.
This model G12 was built for Israel Railways in 1954 by General Motors, USA. The 26 locomotives of this type formed the backbone of Israel Railways motive power for several decades and some worked in various duties all over the network for over 50 years.

 

 

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